Explore Feed Test: Facebook To End News Feed Experiment In 6 Countries

Social media giant Facebook said that it would eventually end its experiment called the “Explore Feed Test.” The experiment was tested in six countries from which it separated posts from news sites from other materials found on the social media network.

“We constantly try out new features, design changes and ranking updates to understand how we can make Facebook better for everyone. Some of these changes-like Reactions, Live Video, and GIFs- work well and go on to become globally available. Others don’t, and we drop them. Today, we’re ending one of those tests: the Explore Feed,” Adam Mosseri, who heads Facebook’s News Feed, said in a statement posted in Facebook’s newsroom.

 

What is Facebook’s Explore Feed Test

 

Mosseri said that the social media giant could perform well had it communicated with publishers about its so-called Explore Feed Test. Several news organizations from Slovakia, Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Bolivia, Guatemala and Serbia hit out the company for allegedly “blindsiding” them.

 

Facebook’s Explore Feed Test started back in October, and Facebook users complained that the experiment actually contributed to the rise of fake news.

 

“In surveys, people told us they were less satisfied with the posts they were seeing, and having two separate feeds didn’t actually help them connect more with friends and family,” Mosseri explained. “We also received feedback that we made it harder for people in the test countries to access important information, and that we didn’t communicate the test clearly,” she added.

The Facebook official said that based on the survey “people don’t want two separate feeds.”

“We think our recent changes to News Feed that prioritize meaningful social interactions better address the feedback we heard from people who said they want to see more from friends and family. Those changes mean less public content in News Feed like posts from businesses, brands, and media,” she said.

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Mart Sambalud

Mart is part tech-savvy and part news junkie. He is a journalist by profession. Why? Because he loves to curate and write news that matter to people. A traveller by heart, an art and photography lover, too.

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