Fake News

After Google, Facebook Steps Up War On Fake News

After Alphabet-owned company Google, social media giant Facebook is stepping up its campaign to combat fake news online. The social media company is now introducing a new feature that would change how fake news would be flagged down.

This week, Facebook claims that it started showing warning signs to articles that could potentially mislead people. The company said that it has to employ a more effective strategy because fabricated media reports tend to appear more credible and believable to netizens.

The feature, according to Facebook, will alert users about the article if it is misleading. This can be done by using a third-party fact-checking websites. The fact-checking websites will assess if the content is e either fake or misleading.

How Facebook is killing fake news on the web?

With the current feature, Facebook users will be able to see related articles next to the stories that contained questionable information. By doing so, it will give further context and eventually help users discern if the information coming from offending stories are fake or not.

“Academic research on correcting misinformation has shown that putting a strong image, like a red flag, next to an article may actually entrench deeply held beliefs – the opposite effect to what we intended,” Facebook product manager Tessa Lyons as quoted saying in a Facebook blogpost.

“False news undermines the unique value that Facebook offers: the ability for you to connect with family and friends in meaningful ways. It’s why we’re investing in better technology and more people to help prevent the spread of misinformation,” Lyons added.

The Facebook official further explained that they are making progress on their efforts to fight fake news.

“Overall, we’re making progress. Demoting false news (as identified by fact-checkers) is one of our best weapons because demoted articles typically lose 80 percent of their traffic. This destroys the economic incentives spammers, and troll farms have to generate these articles in the first place,” she said.

Published by

Mart Sambalud

Mart is part tech-savvy and part news junkie. He is a journalist by profession. Why? Because he loves to curate and write news that matter to people. A traveller by heart, an art and photography lover, too.

>
Exit mobile version