Cybersquatting and .XXX domain name causes trouble for some

The .xxx domain have caused major problems to some sectors of the society. Now, ICANN, a top level domain name registrar, has offered a new type of domain name suffix.

If your company can shell out $185,000, then you might be able to have a .(company name) as your domain suffix.

This will enable companies to advertise their brand even more personally. The .xxx domain name will look like a cheap rip off of the more personalized suffix.

Speaking of the .xxx, a lot of companies and institutions have been troubled by recent developments. Last December, somebody registered vatican.xxx as an address. Unfortunately, it wasn’t the Vatican who registered it.

Now, British brand Virgin is having similar problems. Somebody registered the domain name richardbranson.xxx and they want that. This troubling development -known as cybersquatting- can be used to defame the company’s CEO.

According to a report by BBC, Virgin has said that it spends “a lot of time protecting the Virgin brand and the Richard Branson name, and increasingly this takes us online.”

Unfortunately for them, someone was quicker to pull the trigger as they were late to register the name.

ICM Registry launches .XXX today

After years of legal struggles, more than 100,000 websites of adult content will now have the extension of “.xxx”.

ICM Registry LLC, the registry that operates the domain, has released a statement on this development. “The Internet is home to a wealth of content, suitable for a wide range of ages and values. The adult entertainment industry has, and always will, account for a large amount of this content and while it is enjoyed by some, it is not suitable, or of interest, to all Internet users.”

Initially submitted to the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) in 2000, ICM Registry faced a strong opposition for this top-level domain (TLD)  from conservative groups and politicians which lead to its rejection. The registry was resubmitted in 2004 and ICANN announced its preliminary approval in 2005 and was voted for approval March 18 of this year.

The move was not met without critics. In November, Playboy license owner Manwin Licensing International, together with adult film studio Digital Playground,  has filed a lawsuit to remove the new extension and claimed that the process was illegal.

ICM however, stood their ground and defended this new development in the adult industry. According to them, this will make it easier for parents and employers to block the entire TLD and fans of this uhm, type of content, will have a network of “trusted sites”.

In a statement, ICM aptly explains, “Regardless of your views on adult content, it’s here to stay, so let’s be adult about it.”

Photo Credit: Justin Shattuck, flckr.com

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