You Tube

YouTube for Xbox One X Updated With 4K Support

Xbox One users have something to celebrate this week. The Microsoft gaming console will be receiving an update from YouTube. The news comes after YouTube announced that Xbox One would get a 4K support, a report from The Verge said.

With this development, the 4K support in the Microsoft gaming console will allow Xbox One users to stream videos in 4K quality. Software giant Microsoft has earlier announced that the HDR support for Xbox One is coming soon. Microsoft did not give any specific details as to when the HDR support will roll out in the gaming console.

On Tuesday, December 12, the company, however, told Windows Central, that aside from the 4K support for Microsoft’s Xbox One, it also clarified that a team was assembled to work overtime with the HDR support also for Xbox One S.

Which is which: 4K or HDR support?

Meanwhile, tech analysts noted that Microsoft’s rival, Google was also slow in providing an updated 4K support for Xbox One. It can be recalled that in August 2016, the One S was launched with 4K Blu-ray support. However, it appears though, that the 4K YouTube support will launch in 2018.

Not only the Xbox One app will be receiving the 4K support, but several YouTube apps also include support for the 4K support. This means that You Tube apps can play videos using a 4K resolution with 60 frames per second playback.

For Xbox One users, the 4K video resolution and 60 frames per seconds are ideal specs for watching video games or sports events. Users can eventually download the app as it is rolling out this week.

Unknown to many, Microsoft has two gaming consoles that are capable of rendering 4K video. These gaming consoles are the Xbox One X and Xbox One S. However, the only thing that disappoints the Xbox users is that both gaming consoles are not capable of viewing YouTube in 4K quality.

But Microsoft assured the Xbox One users that it would roll out an update for both Xbox One X and Xbox One S consoles. The update, the company clarified is, support for 4K video resolution and not HDR.

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Mart Sambalud

Mart is part tech-savvy and part news junkie. He is a journalist by profession. Why? Because he loves to curate and write news that matter to people. A traveller by heart, an art and photography lover, too.

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